Consistency is Key

Exercise is one of the most useful tools we have to battle the health risks that surround us. As mentioned in last week’s article, it's an all encompassing “medicine.”

However, it is important to mention that these are benefits we reap from a consistent exercise routine.

 Consistency is key to keeping the habits and results.

Consistency is key to keeping the habits and results.

What do I mean by consistent?

Consistent exercise is one that is done regularly, week after week. Starting this week and returning to exercise weeks later after being inactive is not enough to collect the benefits.

What are the norms to be consistent?

It is recommended that you get at least 150 minutes of activity a week. This is a generalized recommendation and it varies with the individual’s goals. But, especially for beginners, it is a good standard to start with.

 Work your way up!

Work your way up!

The guidelines, according to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), suggests that this activity be broken down into Cardiorespiratory, Resistance, Flexibility, and Neuromotor.

Cardio should be done 5 times a week at a moderate intensity for 30-60 minutes or 3 days a week for 20-60 minutes at a vigorous intensity.

 It's not fun, but it's necessary!

It's not fun, but it's necessary!

Resistance exercise is recommended anywhere between 2-3 days a week, varying the muscle groups targeted, repetitions, and sets. The reps and sets are dependent on the goals of the person. Two-four sets of 8-12 reps is the golden standard to receive equal benefits in power, strength, endurance, and hypertrophy.

 Resistance training is imperative for strong muscles and developing balance.

Resistance training is imperative for strong muscles and developing balance.

Flexibility exercises are recommended 2-3 days a week. The stretches should be held for 10-30 seconds and repeated anywhere between 2-4 times.

 Stretching is important to keep the muscles from becoming stiff and returning proper blood flow.

Stretching is important to keep the muscles from becoming stiff and returning proper blood flow.

Neuromotor exercises are those that target balance, coordination, agility, and gait. Yoga is an excellent example of this type of exercises. The recommendation is 2-3 days a week for 20-30 minutes.

 Balance and coordination becomes especially important as we age. 

Balance and coordination becomes especially important as we age. 

I would suggest to establish a routine and stick to it! That way, you ensure getting the adequate amount of exercise each week and not only be healthier, but also in better physical standing.

 Find a routine that works for you and stick to it!

Find a routine that works for you and stick to it!